Tribute to the “Buff”

… and it’s glorious future!

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7 Responses to Tribute to the “Buff”

  1. weather257 says:

    Great trio…they really make the story come alive, don’t they? Great plane that you really can’t say enough about. American Pride!

    Liked by 4 people

  2. auscitizenmom says:

    I really enjoyed that. Especially the story about the two planes with engine trouble and the BUFF had 7 engines left.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. I luv these planes, I luv flight. So they may be almost 150 years in service if the “updates” don’t screw up the plane! Here’s a takeoff of one of these big boys:

    Inside A B-52 Cockpit • Takeoff To Landing with in air re-fueling

    and on the opposite end of the flight spectrum we have the
    First F-35B Vertical Takeoff Test

    and the F-22 raptor vertical take-off!

    Just thinkin’ what Czar would have said about all these beauties…

    Liked by 3 people

  4. glendl says:

    I lived for 45 years of my life with nuke-laden B-52s taking off and landing 24/7/365. Half the fleet was airborne at all times. Then there were B-52s from other bases landing for repairs from time to time. Needless to say, we were a first-strike target. Yes, we did the nuke attack drills in which whe got under our desks.
    That was our norm and I really doubt that many worried about it. We didn’t cause it and we couldn’t do anything about it.
    We were surrounded by concentric circles of anti-ballistic missiles spaced 10 miles apart. We had attack missiles surrounding us as well.
    There was another base 220 miles east of us and another 300 miles SW of us.

    Like

    • glendl says:

      Subject: B-52

      We have 2 Squadrons stationed here. All this is public information.

      General Characteristics
      Primary Function: Heavy bomber
      Contractor: Boeing Military Airplane Co.
      Power plant: Eight Pratt & Whitney engines TF33-P-3/103 turbofan
      Thrust: Each engine up to 17,000 pounds
      Wingspan: 185 feet (56.4 meters)
      Length: 159 feet, 4 inches (48.5 meters)
      Height: 40 feet, 8 inches (12.4 meters)
      Weight: Approximately 185,000 pounds (83,250 kilograms)
      Maximum Takeoff Weight: 488,000 pounds (219,600 kilograms)
      Fuel Capacity: 312,197 pounds (141,610 kilograms)
      Payload: 70,000 pounds (31,500 kilograms)
      Speed: 650 miles per hour (Mach 0.84)
      Range: 8,800 miles (7,652 nautical miles)
      Ceiling: 50,000 feet (15,151.5 meters)
      Armament: Approximately 70,000 pounds (31,500 kilograms) mixed ordnance — bombs, mines and missiles. (Modified to carry air-launched cruise missiles)
      Crew: Five (aircraft commander, pilot, radar navigator, navigator and electronic warfare officer)
      Unit Cost: $84 million (fiscal 2012 constant dollars)
      Initial operating capability: April 1952
      Inventory: Active force, 58; ANG, 0; Reserve, 18
      General Characteristics
      Primary Function: Heavy bomber
      Contractor: Boeing Military Airplane Co.
      Power plant: Eight Pratt & Whitney engines TF33-P-3/103 turbofan
      Thrust: Each engine up to 17,000 pounds
      Wingspan: 185 feet (56.4 meters)
      Length: 159 feet, 4 inches (48.5 meters)
      Height: 40 feet, 8 inches (12.4 meters)
      Weight: Approximately 185,000 pounds (83,250 kilograms)
      Maximum Takeoff Weight: 488,000 pounds (219,600 kilograms)
      Fuel Capacity: 312,197 pounds (141,610 kilograms)
      Payload: 70,000 pounds (31,500 kilograms)
      Speed: 650 miles per hour (Mach 0.84)
      Range: 8,800 miles (7,652 nautical miles)
      Ceiling: 50,000 feet (15,151.5 meters)
      Armament: Approximately 70,000 pounds (31,500 kilograms) mixed ordnance — bombs, mines and missiles. (Modified to carry air-launched cruise missiles)
      Crew: Five (aircraft commander, pilot, radar navigator, navigator and electronic warfare officer)
      Unit Cost: $84 million (fiscal 2012 constant dollars)
      Initial operating capability: April 1952
      Inventory: Active force, 58; ANG, 0; Reserve, 18

      Like

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