Growing food to feed your family

Here’s Jess again. It’s Spring, and time to think about growing a garden. If you are able and have time, growing food is good for you and your family. You can grow something almost anywhere.

This was recorded at the beginning of the pandemic, and it is chock full of good, practical, information. I know we are mostly past the pandemic now, but we are possibly facing food shortages. She has many suggestions for fast growing plants and how to use them in your cooking, and LOTS of other gardening information. I know this is a long video, but it’s worth your time.

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12 Responses to Growing food to feed your family

  1. Pa Hermit says:

    Lots of info, Thanks Stella. Mornin’ all!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. ernnburn says:

    Thanks Stella, this video is jam packed with wealth of excellent information and advice. I recommend it also. I grew up on a small family farm until I was eighteen. We had four thousand chickens in two full size barns, free-range turkeys, a horse barn for the horses, pigs, goats with all the various outbuildings to maintain, many dogs and cats for varmint control and pets. In addition to a greenhouse with a rotating one-acre vegetable garden, 5 variety apple orchard, pears, peaches, rhubarb, blackberries, blueberries, etc. This year is the first time in many years I am seriously thinking of planting a food crop garden for my own use on the same retired family farm once again.

    Liked by 3 people

    • stella says:

      Good luck with your garden this year, ernnburn! Since Jess made this video, her family has purchased a new farm in South Carolina and moved from Arkansas. It is interesting to see them establish the new gardens, buildings and crops.

      The new farm is much larger and has better soil. Eventually they will build their “forever” home there, and they also plan to start a coffee shop in their nearby small town.

      Liked by 3 people

    • stella says:

      PS: Do you plan on raising animals for eggs, milk, or meat?

      Liked by 1 person

      • ernnburn says:

        I would like to raise 16-18 dual-purpose chickens both for eggs and for meat. I’ll need to start from scratch though and will have to deal with a much larger population of coyotes, hawks and foxes than we had before. At this point, garden first.

        Liked by 3 people

        • stella says:

          I enjoy watching some of the small homesteaders on YouTube, like Jess and Justin Rhodes. Have you considered moveable chicken coops? Move every day or so, and the chicks are always under wire.

          Liked by 2 people

          • auscitizenmom says:

            My DIL’s father built a nice one for them. I don’t know if they took it with them to Montana. The girls loved to collect the eggs. In their “Little House” bonnets and aprons with baskets. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • ernnburn says:

            I saw this technique being used last year and thought it was a great idea. This method was definitely on my mind when I was contemplating restarting raising chickens.

            Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          I was wondering to myself why you were considering only dual-purpose chickens. Then I saw this video today about the American Bresse chickens, which they say is a great dual-purpose chicken, and why they decided to raise them on their farm:

          They also mention Black Cuckoo Maline chickens.

          Like

  3. stella says:

    One thing that I don’t think Jess mentioned is what you should do if you will be seed starting inside your house. I found out many years ago that the seed starting medium/potting soil that you purchase is often contaminated with ‘fungus gnat’ eggs. They lay dormant until you add water and start your seeds, then they hatch and fly all over your house! They are the devil to get rid of once they hatch. Besides that, the larvae can damage or kill your young plants.

    To eliminate the risk, you should sterilize the soil. There are several ways to do this inside your home: baking the soil, putting some into a container and pouring boiling water into it, or microwaving small amounts at a time in your microwave.

    I use the microwave. Put a small amount into a gallon zip top bag and moisten the soil. Leaving the top partly open to allow steam to escape, microwave on high power until the soil reaches a temp between 160 and 180 degrees. How long will depend on how much soil you have and the power of your microwave. Probably won’t take any more than a couple of minutes. When it is done, close the bag, let the soil cool, then plant!

    Liked by 3 people

    • stella says:

      You can do more if you use the oven or the boiling water methods, but it is messier.

      ADD: If you don’t want to mess with soil in the house, you can also use coconut coir or peat pellets to start seed. Less messy, but more expensive.

      Liked by 3 people

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