Our military veterans, and Honor Flight (One last mission)

We can’t all be heroes. Some of us have to stand on the curb and clap as they walk by.— Will Rogers

I realize that Memorial Day is set aside to honor those who have died in service to our country. Still, I want to put a spotlight on this organization that provides a great service for veterans, particularly those who served during WWII. All of the men I knew who served in WWII and Korea – relatives and friends – have now died.

Honor Flight, The Organization

Our Mission: To transport America’s Veterans to Washington, DC to visit those memorials dedicated to honor the service and sacrifices of themselves and their friends.
Honor Flight Network is a non-profit organization created solely to honor America’s veterans for all their sacrifices. We transport our heroes to Washington, D.C. to visit and reflect at their memorials. Top priority is given to the senior veterans – World War II survivors, along with those other veterans who may be terminally ill.

Of all of the wars in recent memory, it was World War II that truly threatened our very existence as a nation—and as a culturally diverse, free society. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, an estimated 640 WWII veterans die each day. Our time to express our thanks to these brave men and women is running out.

Honor Flight, The Movie

NOTE: If you are an Amazon Prime member, this movie is included with your membership.

According to Wikipedia, The premiere of the 2012 documentary Honor Flight: One Last Mission at Miller Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, set a new Guiness World Record for the largest attendance at a film premiere: 28,442 people. The film, shown on a 5,940-square-foot (552 m2) video board, depicts the lives of four World War II veterans who were part of the first Honor Flight from Milwaukee’s Stars and Stripes Honor Flight Hub.

Honor Flight is a heartwarming documentary about four living World War II veterans and a Midwest community coming together to give them the trip of a lifetime. Volunteers race against the clock to fly thousands of WWII veterans to Washington, DC to see the memorial constructed for them in 2004, nearly 60 years after their epic struggle.

The trips are called “Honor Flights” and for the veterans, who are in their late 80s and early 90s, it’s often the first time they’ve been thanked and the last trip of their lives. The 24-hour journey is full of surprises that deeply move all who are involved. It’s uncommon for World War II veterans to talk about the War, but the Honor Flight experience brings their stories out. Many veterans say, with the exception of their wedding day and the birth of their children, the trip is the best day of their life.

However, success is all but ensured. 1,000 World War II veterans die every day and getting them on an Honor Flight in time is a constant battle. The film features Orville Lemke, a former plumber and beloved father of nine who fights to hold off terminal cancer so he can make the trip, and Julian Plaster, an 89-year-old poet who has survived almost all of his friends and family.

This video is just one of many available on the internet. These trips mean a lot to our veterans.

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