It’s Caturday!

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51 Responses to It’s Caturday!

  1. MaryfromMarin says:

    “Some videos will never get old…”

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Lucille says:

    Cole and Marmalade’s Mom and Dad are fostering some foundling kittens…soooo….
    Why is the Bathroom Door Closed?!

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Lucille says:

    Leopard cub photos by Fred Winckelmann….

    Liked by 5 people

  4. czarowniczy says:

    Weighed out inside fat cat the other day – 23 pounds. He doesn’t look 23 pounds but, when you pick him up, he freels ever bit of 23 pounds. He doesn’t appear to eat that much – maybe he orders in when we’re out.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. lovely says:

    I may have posted this already but it’s just so dang cute πŸ™‚ !

    Liked by 3 people

  6. WeeWeed says:

    Liked by 5 people

  7. WeeWeed says:

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Since we are doing trains & draft horses I thought I would show the largest breed of cat – the Maine Coon Cat. It has a distinctive physical appearance and valuable hunting skills. It is one of the oldest natural breeds in North America, specifically native to the state of Maine where it is the official state cat. The Maine Coon is a large and sociable cat, hence its nickname, “the gentle giant.” Reputed for its intelligence and playful, gentle personality, the Maine Coon is often cited as having “dog-like” characteristics. Maine Coon cats learn tricks relatively easily.

    On average they weigh around 15-25 pounds. Some get even larger. In 2010, the Guinness World Records accepted a male purebred Maine Coon named “Stewie” as the “Longest Cat” measuring 48.5 in nose to end of tail. Maine Coons have several physical adaptations for survival in harsh winter climates. Their dense water-resistant fur is longer and shaggier on their underside and rear for extra protection when they are walking or sitting on top of wet surfaces of snow or ice. Their long and bushy raccoon-like tail is resistant to sinking in snow, and can be curled around their face and shoulders for warmth and protection from wind and blowing snow and it can even be curled around their backside like an insulated seat cushion when sitting down on a snow or ice surface. Large paws, and especially the extra-large paws of polydactyl Maine Coons, facilitate walking on snow and are often compared to snowshoes. Long tufts of fur growing between their toes help keep the toes warm and further aid walking on snow by giving the paws additional structure without significant extra weight. Heavily furred ears with extra long tufts of fur growing from inside help keep their ears warm. (They also have a long nose.) ~ h/t wiki

    This one looks like it’s about to catch something

    Here is a person holding one for size comparison

    here is a better look at the length and size of the tail

    and here is a cute kitten

    Do you think this is the type of cat you have Czar? They are beautiful cats.

    Liked by 4 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      It appears to me that a cat like this could cover everything in the room in cat hair just by walking through. LOL

      Liked by 3 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      Oh, and they are gorgeous. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

    • The Tundra PA says:

      Thanks for this, TOGC. Though I consider myself a dog person, I do love cats also. Have had as many as 6 at one time many years ago, but none in the past decade. My fave was a big old male orange tabby affectionately known as Red Kitty. Heck of a rat killer. Would eat the head only and present the rest on the doorstep as a gift. He weighed about 18 lbs in his prime and lived to be almost 20 years old. If I ever have another cat, it will be a Maine Coon. I’ve looked into it, there is only one breeder of Maine Coons in Alaska and they apparently have quite a wait list. I may have to travel to the Lower 48 to find one. Interesting to me that the breed comes in all colors.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hello πŸ™‚

        I would NOT get a MCC accepted by the Cat Fanciers’ Assoc. As shown below they have changed them to be similar to a regular housecat, and also do not allow cats with 6 toes. (It’s terrible what some humans do to cats, and especially dogs.)

        Perhaps by contacting places such as maine-coon-cat-nation dot com or mainecoon dot org or web surfing you may find the few breeders left who breed a real MCC, and NOT the CFA so-called Maine Coon Cat.

        Certain colors are not allowed because they indicate crossbreeding, such as chocolate, lavender, the Siamese pointed patterns or the “ticked” patterns, and are not accepted by some breed standards. The most common pattern seen in the breed is brown tabby. Below is a white MCC.

        and here is an orange

        I’ve lived over 60 years in New England have seen these cats occasionally. They are just amazing. I hope you find a REAL one!

        Liked by 2 people

    • lovely says:

      Beautiful but that first one reminds me of Don King!

      Like

    • czarina33 says:

      Looks more like our old cat Walter, who died a few years back. He wasn’t MCC! Not big enough, but a really beautiful color & coat texture. George (of the brother & sister team who showed up on the porch in NO one day) was the biggest cat we ever had, but he was just an orange & white long hair with a big appetite. Gracie, his sister, was brindle/motley pattern, also long haired but svelte.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Menagerie says:

    Sigh. They finally got me. Please, don’t tell the dogs.

    Liked by 1 person

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