Video and song of the day

I think it’s time to do another week featuring Scotland. What do you think?

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50 Responses to Video and song of the day

  1. joshua says:


    I’ll Hae Nae Mair o’ Yer Cheese

    I’ll Hae Nae Mair o’ Yer Cheese

    1.
    I’ll hae nae mair o’ yer cheese,
    I’ll hae nae mair o’ yer cheese.
    The last I got, it stuck in ma throat,
    I’ll hae nae mair o’ yer cheese.

    I see you’re a-bloomin again,
    I see you’re a-bloomin again.
    In yer ee there’s a blink,
    In yer pockets a chink,
    I see ye’re a-bloomin again.
    But

    I’ll hae nae mair o’ yer cheese,
    I’ll hae nae mair o’ yer cheese,
    The last I got, it stuck in ma throat,
    I’ll hae nae mair o’ yer cheese.

    2.
    I’ll eat nae mair
    I’ll eat nae mair
    I’ll eat nae mair a your cheese
    For the last I ate has stuck in ma throat
    And gien me the heart disease.
    ________________________________________________________

    (1) Nicht at Eenie (1932), 31.
    (2) Collected 1989; ultimately from Airdrie, c. 1930.
    Tune: 2nd part of The Cock o the North. Cf. note to
    “Wallifou fa’ the Cat”.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. czarowniczy says:

    I see no reason to scotch the tradition.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. czarowniczy says:

    Liked by 1 person

    • Listen while you read!
      NATIONAL ANTHEM
      Miscellaneous
      The Flower Of Scotland (Scotland)
      Written By Roy Williamson

      O flower of Scotland
      When will we see
      Your like again
      That fought and died for
      Your wee bit hill and glen
      And stood against him
      Proud Edward’s army
      And sent him homeward
      Tae think again

      The hills are bare now
      And autumn leaves lie thick and still
      O’er land that is lost now
      Which those so dearly held
      That stood against him
      Proud Edward’s army
      And sent him homeward
      Tae think again

      Those days are passed now
      And in the past they must remain
      But we can still rise now
      And be the nation again
      That stood against him
      Proud Edward’s army
      And sent him homeward
      Tae think again

      O flower of Scotland
      When will we see
      Your like again
      That fought and died for
      Your wee bit hill and glen
      And stood against him
      Proud Edward’s army
      And sent him homeward
      Tae think again

      The hills are bare now
      And autumn leaves lie thick and still
      O’er land that is lost now
      Which those so dearly held
      O flower of Scotland
      When will we see
      Your like again
      That fought and died for
      Your wee bit hill and glen
      And stood against him
      Proud Edward’s army
      And sent him homeward
      Tae think again

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Lucille says:

    Very attractive voice. I’d not heard of him before and so looked up his bio to find he’s quite popular on his channel.

    You think it’d be nice if his “choir members” each had a different color scarf or Scot plaid, though? LOL!

    As for your starting another Scot-themed blog patch, I’m sure the gang could come up with enough material for the comment section.

    Liked by 1 person

    • joshua says:

      thar be no Scottie “plaids” me lassie….dem be Tartans…

      Like

      • Lucille says:

        Ah staaynd kurrekted!

        Afterall, the ancestors came from Ireland, stopping on the way to the New World to pick up some Scottish wives. We should be called Irish Scots but apparently we’re Scot-Irish.

        Like

        • joshua says:

          my crowd came from Ireland too, married in Dublin….got in some trouble, and immigrated to North America pre rev war.

          My grandmother was a Kelly….says it all.

          Like

  5. The song refers to the Battle of Brannockburn in 1314, when King Robert The Bruce defeated King Edward II. The Flower of Scotland is the Thistle. This an epic and pirate version with nice photos.

    Like

    • Some beautiful photos of Edinburgh castle in this video, lovely. It’s the big one on the top of a huge rockytop with the gardens beneath. When you ride the train into Edinburgh, you come into the city with this as a backdrop. Breathtaking! It’s run by the military, and they shoot a cannon every day at 1:00 pm. The city sets it’s clocks by it.

      I also spied the spires of St. Giles Cathedral in one as well.

      There are only 2 places on Earth that drive me to tears of happiness. Scotland and N. E. Georgia. They are actually similar in terrain, but Scotland is a bit colder and the times of day are strange because they are so North. Kinda like Alaska!

      I gotta go find a hanky…

      Liked by 2 people

  6. lovely says:

    And one more ❀️

    Like

  7. At a Scots wedding the DJ yelled, “Would all married men please stand next to the one person who made their life worth living”!

    The bartender was almost crushed to death!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. joshua says:

    Haggis

    now what could go wrong eating one of these lovelies??

    Ingredients

    1 sheep’s stomach or ox secum, cleaned and thoroughly, scalded, turned inside out and soaked overnight in cold salted water
    heart and lungs of one lamb
    450g/1lb beef or lamb trimmings, fat and lean
    2 onions, finely chopped
    225g/8oz oatmeal
    1 tbsp salt
    1 tsp ground black pepper
    1 tsp ground dried coriander
    1 tsp mace
    1 tsp nutmeg
    water, enough to cook the haggis
    stock from lungs and trimmings

    Method

    Wash the lungs, heart and liver (if using). Place in large pan of cold water with the meat trimmings and bring to the boil. Cook for about 2 hours.

    When cooked, strain off the stock and set the stock aside.

    Mince the lungs, heart and trimmings.

    Put the minced mixture in a bowl and add the finely chopped onions, oatmeal and seasoning. Mix well and add enough stock to moisten the mixture. It should have a soft crumbly consistency.

    Spoon the mixture into the sheep’s stomach, so it’s just over half full. Sew up the stomach with strong thread and prick a couple of times so it doesn’t explode while cooking.

    Put the haggis in a pan of boiling water (enough to cover it) and cook for 3 hours without a lid. Keep adding more water to keep it covered.

    To serve, cut open the haggis and spoon out the filling. Serve with neeps (mashed swede or turnip) and tatties (mashed potatoes).

    Like

    • stella says:

      Well, considering that we all eat sausage, which is stuffed into a pig’s intestine, and contains stuff like eyes and various other unmentionable animal parts, I really can’t see that haggis is much worse.

      Like

      • auscitizenmom says:

        Probably why I don’t eat sausage. I always had the feeling there were “things” in it. πŸ™„

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          It’s delicious, though. I was watching (again) an episode of Victorian Farm. As the woman was cooking a pig’s head, she remarked, “Anybody who thinks they’ve never eaten eyes is kidding themselves.”

          Like

          • auscitizenmom says:

            When I was at my granddaughter’s B-day, along with my ex and his new wife and the other grandparents, they decided to have, I think it was brockwurst, and they got some for me that was chicken. I gagged down about 3/4 of it and finally hid the last of it under some potato salad. Not my cup of tea. 😯

            Like

          • Lucille says:

            Oh, wow, I’m never even looking at another sausage, let alone eating one!

            Like

      • joshua says:

        it is the texture of the inside of a stomach…all those little “feelie thingies”….as well as it it tough as a football unless you boil it until you run out of firewood.

        Like

    • auscitizenmom says:

      {{gag}}

      Liked by 1 person

  9. joshua says:

    guaranteed to help blow the neeps and tatties unless you get about a liter of Drambuie on top of the mess, and without downing a liter of Glenlivet, forget eating this little lovely.

    Did this all in 1962 in Edinborough…..never agin…..

    Like

    • 1st time I ever tried haggis, it was from a chip shop, and tasted of shite. The boys at the lab I worked for told me it was because it WAS shite. They took me to ” Grainger’s the Butcher” in Cowdenbeath. He has awards for his haggis. We got slices of haggis and took it to the lab and fried it in a pan and put it on “morning rolls” from the bakery with “Broon sauce”. They were absolute heaven! The secret of eating haggis, is to get it from someone that knows what they are doing! Grainger’s was also good with tatties and neeps, I know, because I took some home and made it meself. My DH couldn’t believe it when he came home from the Persian Gulf and his wife could cook his olde favs! Imagine that, a yank that could cook the olde ways.

      Liked by 2 people

      • joshua says:

        the concept of “broon sauce” is also a tad suspect, IMO……being a Southerner, we go for the white creamy sauce, or else the Jack Daniels sauce….

        Like

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