In honor of Columbus Day …

10 Horrors Of Aztec Ritual Human Sacrifice

Here is Number 7:

Usually, a victim would be taken to the top of a great pyramid and laid down over a sacrificial stone. A priest would stand over him, holding a knife with a blade of volcanic glass. That blade would come down upon the victim’s chest and break it open, and the priest would tear out his still-beating heart.

The priest would hold the heart up high for all to see. Then he would dash it to pieces against the sacrificial stone. The lifeless body would be rolled down the steps of the pyramid, where butchers were waiting below to dismember the body piece by piece.

The skull would be removed and placed on a rack along with the skulls of the other sacrificed dead. Then the flesh from the body would be cooked into meals and fed to the nobles.

And Number 5:

Not every sacrifice was normal. There were exceptional times when things were done differently. Sometimes, the methods were different. Other times, the difference was the sheer volume.

The greatest was during the reconsecration of the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan. The Aztecs had spent years building up the temples in their capital city, and in 1487, the Great Pyramid was complete. They held a massive celebration to inaugurate their great temple—and slaughtered an incredible number of people.

The Aztecs claimed that they sacrificed 84,000 people over a period of four days. During the reign of the Aztecs, an estimated 250,000 people were sacrificed across Mexico during an average year.

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12 Responses to In honor of Columbus Day …

  1. Make a liberal angry: tell the truth.

    And the Aztecs were not the only ones who practiced human sacrifice either.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. czarowniczy says:

    Poo-poo, a value judgement predicated on Eurocentric ethnocentrism. The cultural relevance of these religious practices can only be judged by the practicing culture as judgements made by those outside of that culture are filtered through the observer’s own cultural prism…and that’s racist.
    See, knew that minor in cultural anthropology would come in handy someday. See Prime Directive.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. ImpeachEmAll says:

    Stirring the cobwebs, Trump style… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Lucille says:

    Excellent book I’ve had around for years is “War Before Civilization–the Myth of the Peaceful Savage” published in 1996 by Lawrence H. Keeley. Here’s a 50 second blurb and a Wiki article about it:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Before_Civilization

    Liked by 1 person

  5. lovely says:

    The heroes of Planned Parenthood.

    Like

  6. Jacqueline Taylor Robson says:

    It’s no wonder they died out and the jungles covered up their massive pyramids. That’s a lot of killing!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Stella! I cannot believe you posted this as a Post. You rock.

    Imagine. If Columbus hadn’t arrived, this might still be going on today.

    Isn’t there a greeting-card company that will actually let you upload and print and send cards to people? Yeah. Quite a few.

    I saw this image, or one just like it, on Monday, and almost copied it here, and said to myself, “No, Stella would not approve.”, and refrained.

    😀

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Menagerie says:

    For those of you who think of Our Lady of Gaudalupe as a somewhat ugly icon Hispanics are attached to, I would suggest that you might be interested in her real story, and it is a doozy. Full of miracles that baffle scientists, doctors, and opthamologists to the present day.

    https://www.catholiceducation.org/en/culture/catholic-contributions/the-amazing-truth-of-our-lady-of-guadalupe.html

    Opening paragraph of the article: Our Lady came to offer faith, hope and consolation to the oppressed natives of Mexico and to reconcile them with their Spanish rulers. She put an end to the bloody human sacrifice of the Aztecs and converted ten million natives in the next 10 years!

    Liked by 1 person

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