General Discussion, Thursday, December 8, 2016

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160 Responses to General Discussion, Thursday, December 8, 2016

  1. MaryfromMarin says:

    Happy Thursday! Have a cookie?

    Liked by 9 people

  2. texan59 says:

    Gettin’ closer to Friday. Coffee up y’all.

    Liked by 8 people

  3. ZurichMike says:

    Today is an important feast day for Catholics: The Feast of the Immaculate Conception of Mary. A particular song is noted for this day: Immaculate Mary, based on a folk tune from the Pyrenees. If sung correctly, it’s beauitful; otherwise it’s a caterwauling dirge as Catholics listening to bad church choirs can attest to.

    I do not wish to engage in doctrinal discussions about Mary. Please just enjoy the music. Here is a beautiful rendition: a trio sings in French, then the choir in English:

    Liked by 9 people

  4. ImpeachEmAll says:

    US judge reverses order
    requiring vote recount in Michigan

    A federal judge in Michigan on Wednesday revoked his order requiring a recount of the state’s presidential vote sought by Jill Stein, siding with a state appeals court that found the Green Party candidate had no grounds to mount the challenge.

    U.S. District Judge Mark Goldsmith’s ruling has the effect of halting the recount in Michigan, at least for now, following conflicting rulings a day earlier by federal and state appeals courts.

    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/12/08/us-judge-reverses-order-requiring-vote-recount-in-michigan.html

    Liked by 4 people

  5. ImpeachEmAll says:

    Time for another log on the fire…

    Liked by 5 people

  6. nyetneetot says:

    Mornin’ stella! (Smiter of those that ought to be smote) 😎 🍸 (Long Island Iced Tea)
    Mornin’ WeeWeed! (Master Mixologist Extrodinare) 😎 🍸 (Old Fashioned)
    Mornin’ Menagerie! 😎 |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| |_| (Jack Daniels – Single Barrel )
    Mornin’ Ad rem! (Queen Felis catus) 🐱 🍸 (Flaming Lamborghini)
    Mornin’ Sharon! 😎 🍸 (earthquake)
    Mornin’ ytz4mee! 😎 🍸 (cosmopolitan)
    Mornin’ waltzingmtilda! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (white wine and perrier)
    Mornin’ partyzantski! πŸ™‚ |_| (Tom Collins)
    Mornin’ texan59! πŸ™‚ |_| (Black & Tan)
    Mornin’ ZurichMike! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (fuzzy navel)
    Mornin’ Col.(R) Ken! (hand salute) πŸ™‚ |_| (Boilermaker)
    Mornin’ Czarina! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Lynchburg Lemonade)
    Mornin’ czarowniczy! πŸ™‚ |_| (Wild Turkey Rare Breed)
    Mornin’ letjusticeprevail2014! πŸ™‚ |_| (Irish Car Bomb)
    Mornin’ Patriot1783-ctdar! (aka “ctdar”) πŸ™‚ 🍸 (grasshopper)
    Mornin’ tessa50! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (flaming volcano)
    Mornin’ waltzingmtilda! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (sidecar)
    Mornin’ varsityward! πŸ™‚ |_| (Godfather)
    Mornin’ MaryfromMarin! πŸ˜€ |_| (Mortlach)
    Mornin’ Wooly Phlox! (aka “taqiyyologist”) πŸ™‚ |_| (Roy Rogers)
    Mornin’ Howie! πŸ™‚ |_| (Classic Daiquiri)
    Mornin’ TwoLaine! πŸ™‚ |_| (Gin & Tonic)
    Mornin’ Sha! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Lemon Drop)
    Mornin’ BigMamaTEA! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Harvey Wallbanger)
    Mornin’ cetera5! (aka “Cetera”) πŸ™‚ |_| (Blackberry wine)
    Mornin’ The Tundra PA! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (bailey irish cream on the rocks)
    Mornin’ lovely! πŸ™‚ |_| (Backdraft)
    Mornin’ michellc! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Salty dog)
    Mornin’ auscitizenmom! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Kiss on the Lips)
    Mornin’ Margaret-Ann! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (White Russian)
    Mornin’ Auntie Lib! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Tom and Jerry)
    Mornin’ holly100! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Jack & Coke)
    Mornin’ Pam! πŸ™‚ (Not even water)
    Mornin’ Ms.Tee! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Mojito)
    Mornin’ koolkosherkitchen! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Cuba Libre)
    Mornin’ ImpeachEmAll πŸ™‚ |_| (Flaming Dr. Pepper)
    Mornin’ Monroe! πŸ™‚ |_| (Stinger)
    Mornin’ Les! πŸ™‚ |_| (Rusty Nail)
    Mornin’ shiloh1973! πŸ™‚ |_| (Jack Daniels)
    Mornin’ TexasRanger! πŸ™‚ |_| (Whiskey Smash)
    Mornin’ Ziiggii! πŸ™‚ |_| (B52)
    Mornin’ oldiadguy! πŸ™‚ |_| (Rum & Coke)
    Mornin’ smiley! (“stuck in spambucket”) πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Spanish coffee)
    Mornin’ derk! (β€œStellars”) πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Mudslide)
    Mornin’ Jacqueline Taylor Robson πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Shirley Temple)
    Mornin’ facebkwallflower! πŸ™‚ |_| (Night Train Express)
    Mornin’ Ms. Cindy! (aka “Ms Cynlynn” aka “ms cynlynn”) πŸ™‚ 🍸 (1970 ducru beaucaillou)
    Mornin’ sandandsea2015! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (1961 ChΓ’teau Montrose)
    Mornin’ amwick! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (Blue motorcycle)
    Mornin’ hocuspocus13! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (1970 Chateau Latour)
    Mornin’ Sloth1963! πŸ™‚ 🍸 (1971 Moulin Touchais)
    Mornin’ MTeresa! (Ex-lurker) πŸ™‚ |_| (Albanian Raki Moskat)
    Mornin’ Rhea Salacia Volans! πŸ™‚ |_| (Hot Buttered Rum)
    Mornin’ joshua! πŸ™‚ |_| (Hot Buttered Rum)
    Mornin’ whiners and complainers! πŸ˜› (No drink for you!)
    Mornin’ to people posting that I missed. 😳
    Mornin’ to all you lurkers! πŸ˜•

    Also just in case someday; mornin’ to Elvis Chupacabra, F.D.R. in Hell and sundance! :mrgreen:

    Breakfast!

    NEW and IMPROVED breakfast with extra bacon for ZurichMike!

    Pastries for coffee!

    Liked by 8 people

  7. derk says:

    Good Morning Stella, crew.
    Have I said lately that I love this Place? https://twitter.com/SurreyRoadCops/status/402506502109663232/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Well, I do.
    Have a Great Day y’all.

    Liked by 8 people

  8. derk says:

    Forgot the double space.

    ?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    =D

    Liked by 7 people

  9. amwick says:

    Morning all,
    Quiet here since DH is sleeping on the sofa. Yesterday he had some minor surgery, but the whole ordeal has taken its toll. One finger was cut open to remove a growth, so now his hand is wrapped up and splinted almost to the elbow. It was interesting to see this orthopedic practice, they do day surgery that includes hip replacements. Unbelievable. My neighbor is a surgical nurse there, and she was so nice and came to see us after the procedure.
    I am spending time at home working on a craft project, a stable for my little nativity set. Yes, I am watching glue dry..literally. Today I am bringing out the glue gun,,, this is huge. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 12 people

  10. lovely says:

    The Left is coming for Sheriff Clarke with both barrels.

    The real news.

    What the Journal Sentinel left out of its β€˜hit job’ on Sheriff Clarke

    http://watchdog.org/283725/sheriff-clarke-journal-sentinel-inmates/

    There are so many negative histrionic articles printed about Clarke by the Journal that I’m not sure which specific one WI Watchdog is referring to, but here is one that gives you a flavor of Team Left.

    Medical examiner ‘threatened’ by Clarke over jail deaths

    http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/daniel-bice/2016/12/01/medical-examiner-threatened-clarke-over-jail-deaths/94746392/

    Current status; The Crazies are ballyhooing for Clarke to resign because the 4 deaths in Milwaukee jails are his fault.

    One of the four deaths is a baby who was stillborn. One account I read referred to the death of a newborn. The baby was not born alive. Amazing how the Liberal rats accept that a baby is a baby when its being a choice, to be destructed at the whim of its host, is inconvenient to their narrative.

    Steps off soapbox.

    Liked by 5 people

    • czarowniczy says:

      Jails are jails, to completely cobtrol caged animals you’d need as many deputies as you had prisoners. You cage animals and you get concentrated animal behaviors, liberal reformers whine about the results of such caging but offer nonrealistic solutions. They won’t set foot onto a jail either.

      Liked by 3 people

      • amwick says:

        Dh’s son in law is a corrections officer… Thankless job,,, and dangerous I think. It amazes me the cost of keeping people in jail or prison.. then again what is the cost of letting them run around?

        Liked by 2 people

        • John Denney says:

          The ancient Israelites had no prisons. Trials were immediate, and justice meted. Putting someone in prison served no purpose. A thief was not imprisoned, but required to pay back two or three times what he stole. If he couldn’t repay, he became the victim’s servant to work off the debt.
          Murder was the death penalty. Manslaughter, the perp had to flee to a sanctuary city; if he left the city, he could be legally killed by the victim’s family.
          No drug or alcohol laws.
          Assault? The perp would suffer the same beating as the victim, from whence the phrase, “eye for an eye”.
          Bearing false witness against an innocent accused? You get the penalty the accused would have received.

          Liked by 1 person

        • joshua says:

          Sheriff Joe has the cost deal DOWN PAT…bologna sandwiches and grow their own stuff.

          Liked by 1 person

        • czarowniczy says:

          I took my training at the academy run by the Orleans Parish Sheriff, it was a bit more jsil oriented than street. I can say thst if I never have to pull cell block shakedown and stare up a prisoner’s naughty bits it will be too soon.

          Liked by 2 people

      • lovely says:

        Keep in mind that the rat bastage Chris Abele, Milwaukee’s County Executive went to war to wrest as much control of the Milwaukee Prison and jails as he could from Clarke. One area where Abele was successful is the contract binding the private health care provider
        responsible for assessing and monitoring health care for the incarcerated.

        Did I mention Abele is a monied liberal who is finding himself?

        Liked by 3 people

        • czarowniczy says:

          Jails are all about money. The city of New Orleans, except for a few acres, comproses all of Orleans Parish. The city police department is the primary LEA in thebparish with the other LEA (constable, sheriff, park police,etc) having specific duties. One of the SO’s duties is running the jail.
          The city puts its arrests the state some of its overflow non-violent offenders and the Feds also house prisoners with county jails, paying a lot more a day than the city does. There are also the many service and supply contracts a jail had…no small potatoes there. Jails are as much about $$$$$ as they are housing prisoners.
          It’s beginning herevto look like the city might just try to wrest the lucrative parish prison from the sheriff and make it a city-favorite feeding grounds. Abelevmay not like Clarke but onecwobders if his dislike of Clarke flavored with the like of $$$$$$$?

          Liked by 1 person

          • lovely says:

            The jail is a money grab but Abele’s dislike of Clarke runs far deeper than that. Clarke continuously calls out Milwaukee for their liberal garbage. None of the democrats in Milwaukee have an ounce of love for Clarke. They hate him probably more than they hate Trump.

            Clarke pokes them in the eye continuously, puts up billboards encouraging people to arm themselves.

            And does spots like this;

            Clarke says things like “Al Sharpton to shut up and go back to the gutter.”

            Clarke makes the left wet themselves.

            Liked by 2 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      😯 SMH

      Liked by 1 person

    • ImpeachEmAll says:

      Liked by 3 people

    • ImpeachEmAll says:

      Liked by 5 people

    • Thought you might enjoy this lovely. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  11. WeeWeed says:

    Mornin’ all! I’ve been watching that series by Leah Remini on the aftermath of Scientology….. I had.no.idea……. That they were a pack of nutjobs, I knew. But they’re evil, dangerous nutjobs…..

    Liked by 4 people

    • lovely says:

      Morning WeeWeed! My friend just told me about it yesterday and said I have to watch it.

      Liked by 3 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      Back in the 70’s, a friend became a Scientologist and invited us to go with him one time. When we left, I was shaking and crying uncontrollably. I told my husband I would never go near that place again because there was something evil about it. I cried for hours.

      Liked by 5 people

    • I saw one episode and hope to catch the rest of them. I read an article from a survivor of the cult a few years back and she and her brother were basically prisoners/slaves in the Sea Org. The members with no money are treated worse than farm animals and the celebrities can be treated like royalty.

      Liked by 2 people

    • John Denney says:

      In the early 70’s I read L. Ron Hubbard’s book, “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health “, then went to the public library to research.
      Fascinating.
      In the early 50’s dianetics clubs were all the rage, and were helping many people overcome psychological problems. My understanding is that the “E-meter”, a couple of tin cans the subject would hold, wired to a sensitive ohm-meter, would function as a primitive lie detector, detecting subtle changes in response to questions. When the questioner got a reaction, he would question deeper into that subject, thus helping the person to talk about what was bothering them, which is therapeutic.
      The official psychologists and psychiatrists were losing business, so they had L. Ron Hubbard charged with practicing without a license, and had all the dianetics clubs shut down.
      All was quiet for a couple of years, and then L. Ron Hubbard surfaced again as the founder of a new religion: Scientology. The use of the E-meter was now “spiritual counseling” and thus protected spiritual practice.
      But now, because it was a religion, he had to come up with a belief system, so he did. Probably didn’t hurt that he and his old friend and college room mate Robert Heinlein were science fiction writers.

      Liked by 2 people

    • John Denney says:

      I love kids and am more likely to hang out with them than the adults.

      My son is different, in that we have a bond I do not have with other kids. He’s a muddle of people – I see myself and my wife in him, and his grandfather, yet he is quite distinctly his own person. There is a fascination with how this person that is part you develops, what new talent will suddenly surface. He’s 21 now. We are on the same wavelength in some matters, where he will say something terse and cryptic which leaves my wife baffled, but which I understand perfectly.
      I don’t talk much, unless I’m explaining something or telling a story. But he and my wife will have these long conversations that are rather foreign to me. Sometimes they have, “I love you more” arguments. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 6 people

    • Col.(R) Ken says:

      Evening Ms.WeeWeed!!!!! Loaded 20 boys and girls today and 20-25 tomorrow. Should decrease the work load a bit…….more corn down and buck season is over Saturday at sundown. Then back to the normal poaching by the local boys. Cold today, made it to 24* wind knock that down to 15*-18*. Go the stove up and enjoying the warm fire……

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Cetera says:

    Serious question for those of you who married and had kids:

    Can you please explain to me the difference in your understanding and perception of love and even ability to love others after having kids?

    For instance, I love my wife, as strongly and fiercely as I know how to do, and most days it simply involves doing what I can to help her stay afloat in her crappy teaching job, and rubbing her back as she falls asleep, and then yelling and pushing her out of bed in the morning when my alarm goes off (her emergency backup alarm). I do things for her, and I know she appreciates them, and sometimes even gets emotional trying to thank me for them. This is all well and good, but I often feel, however, like I’m not really loving her enough.

    I have a plethora of younger siblings, one of whom I basically helped raise as a third parent, since he was born when I was 17. I love them all a bunch, but it is obviously different than with my wife, different emotions, different commitment, but still love.

    Then there is love of God. I love Him as much as possible, but it is very easy to be very distracted by all the things going on that I have to pay attention to, or want to pay attention to. I talk to Him informally throughout the day, whenever something occurs to me, but I’m still a sinner, with a heavy attachment to sin, as much as I would like things to be otherwise. I’m very tired and fatigued by this world, but I’m also very much prone to wanting a lot of what it still has to offer, particularly in electronics, video games, movies, etc.

    Anyway, my point is, I feel like I don’t know enough about love, don’t understand enough yet, to really contribute the way I’m supposed to. I think the biggest gap in my experience is not having children. Parents describe their love for their kids in a variety of ways, but it is never anything that I fully understand. I’m hoping some of you can help shed some light there in what it means, as I’m certain there is a lot of reflection in the love of God between parent and child.

    Liked by 5 people

    • joshua says:

      books have been written on this subject. no simple answers other that the definition that I was given in Sunday School as a little kid….”God is Love”….the rest is trying to figure out why Something Happened here on Earth…..As an adult, I had to stop trying to find out WHY and just go DO something good for another person….got me out of my personal need to UNDERSTAND stuff that just IS. this time of year is mentally toxic for the needs to understand that drives a lot of us crazy if we give in to it.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Well the Bible teaches husbands to love their wives even as Christ loved the church. Wives are to love and respect their husbands in return. The biblical example shows us we are to love God above all others, then our spouse, then our children. It’s easy to understand but not always to follow. I would do anything for my husband and kids, but everyone has moments where we don’t prioritize our family and God as we should. It’s a work in progress. Just keep praying and trying to be the best spouse you can, it’s all any of us can do. I definitely love my husband differently than my kids. It is a different bond. Not that one is stronger than the other, just different, I’m not sure how to describe it, but it stems from them being a physical part of me. The bond with my grandson is even different than that of my husband and children, it’s unique in it’s own way and very special. Maybe you should go to a Bible bookstore and find books about it. My daughter did that before she got married and she and her then fiancΓ©e had marriage counseling through church and it really helped them to bond closer.

      Liked by 3 people

    • The Tundra PA says:

      I share that boat with you, Cetera. I never had children, was physiologically unable to reproduce. I spent most of my life blowing it off as No Big Deal. Now in my 60s, I feel deeply what a tremendous loss it was and is. My perception is that the love between a parent and child is the closest thing there is to God’s love, the only experience we can have on earth of absolutely unconditional love.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Cetera says:

        Great comments from all three of you, but none terribly helpful, lol. It confirms for me that there is something I don’t understand, and may not ever, at least in this life. I think your observation is spot on, Tundra.

        I hear you on the loss thing too, Tundra. We tried and tried having kids, and we gave many souls to God who didn’t make it to their day of birth, but my wife was not gifted with a great uterus. Getting pregnant was doable, but she was unable to stay pregnant, no matter what, even after some extensive efforts to help counteract the obstacles. That loss affects her deeply, in ways I still don’t fully understand or appreciate.

        The loss gets me too sometimes, but most of the time I’m OK with my life the way it is. I’m comfortable in my habits and ways, and I pray to our little brood waiting for us to meet them someday. I tried to teach them the “are we there yet?” game via prayer, and to send them to Jesus every day with that, but in the context of “we” being myself and my wife. No idea on the success of that endeavor yet, but it seems only fair and fitting that Jesus have to put up with it since we can’t.

        What brings a lot of this to mind, though, is my parents’ first grandchild. He was born in August, and this is his first Christmas, and there are lots of pictures flowing across the family, and it is a time of great joy for all of us. But it reminds me that I am missing something, and I find myself wondering how that changes things, and what it is like.

        Liked by 1 person

        • amwick says:

          The love of a parent,, I heard it from my mother.. She said to me once, “I would give you the world with a fence around it, if I could.” We were poor, but when she said that I knew in my heart that it was true. God did give us the world with a fence around it, in a sense, if we could only understand it.

          Liked by 3 people

        • derk says:

          Ok, sorry, may have responded wrongly to your question first go round. Actually, getting confused =D.
          I can feel what you are saying, only in the context of knowing what children bring, and if not having ever known what I know now.
          I do believe God is good, and hat He has provide you with a great love for many, and the talent to spread it. I believe you are in the medical field? Not sure, I just remember “shift work” and nights. Fireman? Anyways, the way you’ve expressed yourself here and I’m sure with those around.
          I hope you do not feel robbed or cheated, do not let the Enemy in to deceive you. We all have different journeys, don’t allow your joy to be stolen.

          Like

        • Menagerie says:

          When our first grandchild was born, a little girl after we had all boys, my husband said “At last, I really understand love. She is teaching me how to love.”

          No, this did not mean that he didn’t love me or our sons. We have more time to enjoy and savor the lessons a grandchild brings. When our boys were small our family was engaged in a fierce battle for survival you might say. Times were tough and just having three young ones close in age with my husband working long hours was a real struggle. We had less time to savor, and ponder, our relationships.

          Then came our granddaughter, at a time when we had more time and less pressure. She was unable to do anything at all for us, and as a small infant, she quickly became attached to us, most especially my husband. We gave love to her, yes, and she was able to learn to love us, but loving a child is not like an adult. They need care. They need emotional guidance, they need discipline. They need gawdawful poopy diapers changed, feeding in the middle of the night, someone to walk them for hours when they have tummy aches.

          If humans were animals, that care we offer our young would seem disproportionately given to them, a vast one sided suck of energy not totally explained by an animal’s instinctive protection of its young. But we humans have the ability to love, and the love of a child is as close as we get to the unselfish love God has for us, in most cases. He gains nothing, not even gaining our love in return sometimes. He loves, he gives, he remains true in his commitment to us, no matter our choices.

          However, we must not think that parental love is the only way to experience that kind of love. There are too many saints who have been priests or members of religious orders who found a life based on love of God. Their examples, and the examples of saints like Pier Giorgio Frassati, who never had children, tell us that there are more paths to experiencing this selfless love than the one nature provides most of us with.

          Liked by 1 person

    • John Denney says:

      Hm, my post in response landed above your post, so I’ll try again:

      I love kids and am more likely to hang out with them than the adults.

      My son is different, in that we have a bond I do not have with other kids. He’s a muddle of people – I see myself and my wife in him, and his grandfather, yet he is quite distinctly his own person. There is a fascination with how this person that is part you develops, what new talent will suddenly surface. He’s 21 now. We are on the same wavelength in some matters, where he will say something terse and cryptic which leaves my wife baffled, but which I understand perfectly.
      I don’t talk much, unless I’m explaining something or telling a story. But he and my wife will have these long conversations that are rather foreign to me. Sometimes they have, β€œI love you more” arguments. {smile}

      Liked by 4 people

    • nyetneetot says:

      In my home, cash is required for almost everything. I assume love is the same, I just don’t ever seem to have enough on hand to find out.

      Liked by 2 people

    • derk says:

      “Children fill a hole in your heart you never knew was there.” heard that long ago, and is very true. For me, your heart, or capacity to love is increased where you thought it was already full to the brim. One of God’s amazing wonders, and goes hand in hand with,” The more one gives, the more one receives.” Ever do volunteer or missions work, you know what I mean.
      I believe also that in a child, we get the closest, clearest glimpse into the Father’s heart. You do want to give everything to your child. They are a blank canvass that you are permitted to paint in as you desire. Teach, play, inspire, discipline (the good kind), converse with, experience life with, and hopefully, watch them as they in turn head off on their own to do the same.
      My older brother refused to bring a child into this world. I had two already before he finally relinquished after several years. His comment was, “Now I know”. Changed him forever. A cousin with similar story. Like a Picasso, you can hear all abut it, but until you stand there in front of one, you never know.
      God is amazing in his works, and the allowing of us to experience love, on all of these levels, is truly a gift. God does love us, and as many a child before, myself included, forget the depth, breadth and width of that Love. True, God is love, and he in turns lets us taste it as well. A beautiful thing.

      I have 4 children, 2 girls, 2 boys. All different, varied in so many ways, yet my imprint is on each one. Love them all, but my girls! Ahhhhhhh!!! They’ve got it made where I’m concerned.

      Liked by 1 person

    • derk says:

      As far as ability to love others after having children, if that is what you’re asking above, is that I believe for me, that children expand your heart. Increases the capacity, like the Grinch’s heart that grew two sizes that day.
      It also reveals what unmotivated love is, that is, love not for personal gain. I think it even differs from a spousal love, which has gains, or benefits, attached with it. It is for me, purely given in regards to children.
      They are messy, expensive, and grow every which way but where you thought. Had a good partner in marriage, at least in area of child rearing, and our children were brought up well, never beaten once, and yet love and respect us both. We learned how to conduct ourselves in bringing out their gold, which in turn, made us better people.
      So to me, you have a wider spectrum, a deeper knowledge of love, that then can be used and shared to and with others.

      Liked by 3 people

    • lovely says:

      I have a friend who wanted children since her earliest memory but her and her husband could not have them. She lost 3 babies in utero. She became very depressed and it took her years to come to a truce with God over it. This is my paraphrasing her words;

      Marriage is a nest that you build, a home of togetherness, he brought twigs from his own life, she brought twigs from her life, they fluffed it with the feathers of their life together and the nest became their home. The nest has a purpose and most of us expect to hatch eggs there but sometimes that doesn’t happen and then the nest can become a reminder of that emptiness and/or it can be filled with the love you have for each other. Some days it is going to be a reminder but that doesn’t mean the nest can never be full.

      I think when bad things happen to people it can make them fragile and we in turn let that being fragile treat them in a different way because if things are safe that is better than when they are cracked so we try to just get by with the curtains pulled because we have a fear that if we get used to sunlight and then it goes away our heart will not be able to take the fullness of that darkness.

      I am not in any way being dismissive of your cross, I will never walk in your footsteps because I have children and I did learn how to love unconditionally and immediately and immensely because of them. You are obviously bright and obviously a person who feels things to the depth of your soul or you would not ponder if there is some level of love that you may be missing out on because you are not a parent.

      The answer to that lies between you and God.

      Mathew 18:20 ”For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.”

      β€œGod is love.” Whoever lives in love, lives in God, and God in him.” 1 John 4:8 and 4:16

      So really there is no separation of love, no division, no difference other than our limited perception of it. To experience any of God’s love is to experience all of God’s love.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cetera says:

        I don’t think it is possible for you to be dismissive of me or my cross(es), Lovely!

        It is amazing how many women or families there actually are who can’t have kids for some reason. The number is not small. I never noticed until we couldn’t, but I would guess that between 10-25%, probably closer to 25%, of families have severe reproductive difficulties. It is a lot easier to “hide” that these days, with so many others choosing to not have kids, but it sure seems like human reproductivity is very fragile.

        Maybe it is something we are doing wrong as a society, something we’re putting into our bodies without realizing it. It certainly doesn’t seem like there were that many folks in the past who were barren.

        I wrote some other stuff here too, but I’m not certain that I’m ready to share it yet, nor am I certain that you fine folk need to be stuck listening to it.

        Anyway, thanks for all the responses, all of you! I appreciate it!

        Liked by 2 people

  13. ImpeachEmAll says:

    Liked by 3 people

  14. ImpeachEmAll says:

    Liked by 4 people

  15. czarowniczy says:

    Down in NOLA for the day, have to get the annual termite inspection done on our old house. We gots dem reg’lar ones here but a newer nasty one, the Formosan termite too. This SOB has been known to eat the treated rope on the docks and the tarred caulk between the concrete levee flood walls…yo house be noooooo problem.
    If anyone’s seen or even cares about thebJoe McKnight shooting, we’ll be driving through that corner on the way to the Asian food big-box store, it’s just a coupla blocks from the house.
    Ate lunch at Rocky and Carlos…for thosebunfamiar with the NOLA area’s insider guide to ”cuisine you won’t find millennials at’ it’s an old line frayed blue collar diner with truly local food. Had stuffed artichoke, whop salad and turnip freens. Czarina had fried catfish, whop salad and their signature dish…house-made mac and real cheese. Their Sicilian fare is fantastic but even wesring black clothes Imall too frequently end up getting about 10% of red gravy foods on me. With all of the new restaurants to choose from Rocky’s still has a place in my heart…OK, it’s a small clogged artery but it’s clogged with love. And garlic, can’t forget the garlic.

    Liked by 6 people

  16. Col.(R) Ken says:

    Stella, another great photo….. some where in the Rockies, or Canadian Rockies.

    Liked by 2 people

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